About Us

Page Contents:

What is United Way of Denton County? | Frequently Asked Questions | Additional Links

Here is how lives are improved when you support United Way of Denton County:

Get UWDC e-mail updates!

 

What is United Way of Denton County?

We are a locally-governed, autonomous, 501(c)(3) charitable non-profit organization that was founded in 1951. United Way of Denton County is a powerful movement of volunteers and donors in our community striving to make a difference. Across Denton County, a diverse range of passionate and compassionate people LIVE UNITED to serve those in need across our Denton County.

Our mission is to improve lives in Denton County.

Our vision is to create and sustain relationships that identify and leverage community resources that help children, families, veterans, people experiencing homelessness, and people affected by mental illness - making Denton County the best place to live and work.

How we help: we Listen, Collaborate and Succeed:

  1. Assess our community's needs
  2. Unite people to make change that lasts
  3. Create and implement new, collective solutions
  4. Measure results and adapt accordingly

 

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between United Way of Denton County and United Way Worldwide?

United Way of Denton County is a local non-profit organization, governed and managed by local volunteers and staff who call Denton County home. Your donation to United Way of Denton County stays in Denton County and helps our neighbors here in North Texas.

As an affiliate of United Way Worldwide, we have access to global, research-based tools and resources that help us improve lives in Denton County.

 

Who does United Way of Denton County help?

United Way of Denton County helps people across Denton County - children, families, veterans, people experiencing homelessness, and people affected by mental illness. We work collaboratively with United Way of Metropolitan Dallas and United Way of Tarrant County and a growing number of local non-profit organizations to bring the most help to people living in Denton County. We are constantly evaluating needs, closing gaps, and building assets to create the best Denton County for all of us.

 

Who receives funding from United Way of Denton County?

United Way of Denton County provides financial support to Health & Human Service 501(c)(3) charitable non-profit organizations that improve lives in Denton County. Our volunteers and Board of Directors determine annual Partner Agency Grants and Collective Impact Grants. It is the policy of the Board of Directors of United Way of Denton County to support donor-designated gifts to other Health & Human Service 501(c)(3) charitable non-profit organizations.

 

Does United Way of Denton County perform direct services?

Yes. United Way of Denton County pursues two collaborative strategies to improve lives in Denton County: by supporting our Partner Agencies and by leading Collective Impact Initiatives, often serving as the backbone organization. We perform direct services to fill identified gaps in our community that, when filled, lead to improved lives.

 

What is United Way of Denton County's overhead percentage?

Our overhead percentage is 13%. Our overhead percentage is based on our latest IRS Form 990, Page 10, Line 25, found on our Financial Transparancy page. The formula below is recognized by the Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign, United Way Worldwide, and charity watchdog groups BBB Wise Giving Alliance, Guidestar and CharityNavigator.

((Column C + Column D) / Column A) = Admin %

In 2013, the BBB Wise Giving Alliance, Guidestar and CharityNavigator, three key watchdog groups who evaluate the performance of charities, advised donors in an open letter to also "pay attention to other factors of nonprofit performance: transparency, governance, leadership, and results."

 

Who uses the services of United Way of Denton County's Collective Impact Initiatives and Partner Agencies?

We are all one phone call away from needing help. The people helped by your support are wide-ranging in culture and socio-economic status and sometimes remarkably similar to you. This includes the woman who slept in their car, cleaned up each morning in a gas station restroom, and went to her office every day, hiding her crisis from her co-workers for weeks while her children stayed with a relative. Most families traditionally thought of as well-to-do in Denton County are one major setback away from crisis, and a common sentiment in the United Way movement is, "One day, it could be me."

 

Additional Links

Volunteer Leadership

-- Board of Directors

-- Lifetime Members

-- Volunteer Committees

Staff & Interns

Collective Impact

Financial Transparency

Videos, Photos & Newsletters

Latest News